anti-oxidant

Ever heard of this immune, thyroid and cardio-vascular supporting antioxidant?

Selenium is an essential trace mineral and powerful antioxidant

What is it important for?

  • Supports normal thyroid function
  • Anti- cancer properties
  • Antioxidant protection
  • Improves quality of sperm
  • Cardio-vascular support
  • Helps to regulate cholesterol
  • Important for DNA repair
  • Reduces heavy metal toxicity in the body
  • Immune function support
  • Important for the production of some of protein’s building blocks in the body

Did you know…...?

Other nutrients including vitamin B, C, E and zinc improve selenium’s effectiveness and visa versa 

So how can we include it in our daily diet?

  • Vegetables and fruit; red Swiss chard, turnips and other root vegetables, garlic mushrooms,       radishes courgettes, cabbage , carrots, banana
  • Nuts and seeds; brazil nuts (one of the best sources), pecans, almonds, hazelnuts, cashew         nuts, sesame seeds, flax seeds
  • Beans and pulses; green beans, kidney
  • Wholegrains; oats,  barley,  brown rice
  • Sardines , salmon, herring, Cod oysters, lamb, beef liver, chicken, turkey, egg

An easy selenium rich recipe idea...............

No- Fuss Brown Rice Risotto
  • Heat a knob of butter and add one chopped onion
  • Sautee for 5 minutes  and add 375g sliced mushrooms
  • Cook for a further 5 minutes and add 2 cloves of crushed garlic
  • After a few minutes add 1 ½ cups brown short grain rice, keep stirring
  • Add 4 cups of broth or stock ( keep 1 additional cup of stock back), bring to the boil             and then simmer covered for about 40 minutes
  • During this time keep topping up with last cup of stock a little at a time and keep                 stirring
  • Add 1 cup grated parmesan, 2 teaspoons of tamari, salt and pepper and complete with         2 handfuls of finely chopped Swiss chard
  • Stir in the chard, remove pan from heat and serve

My weekly ‘Nutrient Spotlight’ written for Fields to Fork Organics

If you're not feeling your best and need some guidence, support and focus on your health and nutrition then give me a call. I would love to help. 07961 166582

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Have you heard of this anti-cancer, antioxidant, liver detoxifying mineral?

 Molybdenum is a trace mineral essential for a variety of important functions within the body.

What is it important for?

Anti- cancer properties

Antioxidant support

Liver detoxification

Helps to prevent tooth decay

Important for fertility

Required for the activity of some enzymes in the body

Connective tissue development ( ligaments, cartilage etc)

Breaking down fats

Regulation of iron within the body

Helps to prevent yeast and fungal infections

Needed to convert sulphite to sulphate

Did you know…...?

The molybdenum content in food is vastly dependent on the soil in which it grows and the water it receives for growth.

So how can we include it in our daily diet?

Vegetables and fruit; Cauliflower, green peas, spinach, garlic, tomatoes, celery, cucumber

Beans and pulses; lentils, split peas, black eye peas, lima beans, kidney beans

Seeds and nuts;  sesame seeds, walnuts, almonds

Wholegrains; oats, buckwheat, brown rice, rye, barley

An easy molybdenum rich recipe idea...............

Fragrant Cauliflower Rice
Blitz a whole cauliflower (stalk and leaves removed) in a blender until it resembles slightly larger than couscous sized pieces or alternatively grate the cauliflower by hand
Melt some coconut oil in a pan and throw in a finely chopped onion, a couple of cloves of crushed garlic, 1 teaspoon of turmeric powder, 1 teaspoon of cumin powder, half a teaspoon of ginger powder and season with Himalayan salt and black pepper
Sauté this for a few minutes and keep stirring
Add the cauliflower along with 2 tablespoons or vegetable stock, water or bone broth, gently stir, cover with a lid and allow to steam for approximately 5 minutes
Combine with steamed peas or crushed almonds and serve.

My weekly ‘Nutrient Spotlight’ written for Fields to Fork Organics

If you're not feeling your best and need some guidence, support and focus on your health and nutrition then give me a call. I would love to help. 07961 166582

If you are interested in receiving recipe inspiration, top tips and the latest nutrition news, sign up to my newsletter at and like my Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/marcellerosenutrition/

You can also join my free Facebook Group-  Fuss-Free Healthy Eating  https://www.facebook.com/groups/FussFreeHealthyEating/

 

 

Brilliant Broccoli!

Broccoli contains an abundance of fabulous nutrients and is amazing for our health in so many ways. Perhaps broccoli is known best for its anti-cancer properties and so I will endeavour to explain why. 

Broccoli is exceptional as it has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, along with detoxification promoting abilities. It is this special combination of attributes that are believed to help prevent cancer. 

Broccoli is rich in vitamin C, kaempferol, quercetin, carotenoids, vitamin E and zinc. These anti- oxidants neutralise harmful free radicals and hence reduce oxidative stress in the body. 
The unique combination of glucosinolates found in broccoli, break down to form isothiocyanates (ITC’s). These ITC’s, help to suppress unwanted inflammatory responses in the body. Additionally, the polyphenol kaempferol reduces the effect of allergy associated substances, consequently reducing chronic inflammation in our body.

What’s more, ITC’s help to regulate the detoxification process in the cells of our body. This ensures we are eliminating harmful substances which can accumulate and then contribute to the development cancer.

Broccoli is fantastic in soups, omelettes and stir fries or just lightly steamed to retain its nutrients. Top tip: store your unused stems in the freezer to use in a quick blended vegetable soup.

My weekly ‘Nutritional Nugget’ written for Fields to Fork Organics

If you are interested in receiving recipe inspiration, top tips and the latest nutrition news, sign up to my newsletter at www.marcellerosenutrition.co.uk and like my Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/marcellerosenutrition/

 

Perky Peppers!

Red, yellow, orange, purple, brown or black, these crunchy vegetables will add a splash of colour and some flavoursome tang to any dish.

Peppers are believed to contain 30 different types of carotenoids and a number of flavonoids in addition to an extensive array of vitamins and minerals. 

This potent mix of phyto-nutrients provides excellent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory  properties. The carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin found in peppers are present in high amounts in the retina of the eye. These special nutrients offer protection to the eyes against oxygen related damage.

Peppers also contain two times the amount of vitamin C found in oranges which will offer further antioxidant protection.

Regular intake of antioxidants can reduce the risk of chronic inflammatory conditions including cancer. However it is also the sulphur compounds found in peppers that have further anti-cancer benefits.

Savour in soups, salads or stews; stuff, sauté or steam fry.  Add to frittata, fajitas or simply enjoy your peppers raw with a delicious healthy dip.

My weekly ‘Nutritional Nugget’ written for Fields to Fork Organics

If you are interested in reading more ‘Nutritional Nuggets’, top tips and the latest nutrition news, sign up to my monthly newsletter at www.marcellerosenutrition.co.uk and like my Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/marcellerosenutrition/

Blooming Blackcurrants

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These home-grown, deep purple-black, shiny skinned berries, pack a serious punch when it comes to health benefits. So why is it that they are not a staple in the British diet?

Blackcurrants are bursting with phytonutrients (active compounds found in plants, shown to benefit humans when consumed).Blackcurrants are especially rich in vitamin C and contain good levels of vitamin A, and the minerals calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium and manganese.

Blackcurrant’s special plant nutrients include flavonoids, the pigments that give the plants their colour. One type, the anthocyanins protect fruit from the damaging effects of oxidation.

It is now known that these special nutrients also protect human cells and tissues from free radical damage and are estimated to have five times the antioxidant activity of vitamins C and vitamin E. These protective mechanisms may contribute to the blackcurrant’s particular anti-cancer properties. 

Blackcurrants’ vitamin C and anthocyanin content are especially effective at supporting the health of our body tissue; including our bones, skin, ligaments and tendons. Moreover, they improve the function of our blood vessels and may reduce the risk of developing conditions such as varicose veins, haemorrhoids and atherosclerosis.

Studies have also found that anthocyanins can help raise the levels of healthy bacteria in the gut and consequently contribute to a healthy functioning digestive system, which is important for so many aspects of our health.

Blackcurrants can be enjoyed in muffins, crumble or compote; blended into sorbets or smoothies or juiced for its nutrients. Why not start your day with a high fibre, antioxidant boost by combining porridge oats, cinnamon, mixed seeds and a variety of berries topped with your British blackcurrants?

 

My weekly ‘Nutritional Nugget’ written for Fields to Fork Organics

If you are interested in reading more ‘Nutritional Nuggets’, top tips and the latest nutrition news, sign up to my monthly newsletter at www.marcellerosenutrition.co.uk and like my Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/marcellerosenutrition/

Beautiful Beetroot

Beetroot belongs to the chenopod family and along with other family members (including chard, spinach and quinoa) it does not fail in terms of its super nutritious benefits. Beetroot is a valuable source of folate, iron, copper, magnesium, manganese, potassium and vitamin C.

In addition, beetroot has unique pigments which function as both anti oxidants and anti-inflammatory nutrients. Researchers are beginning to look into whether these nutrients can reduce tumour growth in cancer and though in early stages, there have been encouraging results.

Preliminary studies also indicate that the unique mix of nutrients can help reduce the risk of atherosclerosis and type 2 diabetes. The B complex vitamin choline in beetroot has also been shown to reduce inflammation with regards to cardiovascular disease.

Additionally, the special pigments in beetroot are thought to help stimulate detoxification activity, consequently aiding the removal of toxins from the body.

Beetroot contains a special type of dietary fibre (as with carrots) that is particularly beneficial to our digestive tract and will offer further cardio vascular support.

Don’t forget to make use of the beetroot’s green leaves which are also highly nutritious. Beet greens are especially high in the nutrients lutein and zeaxanthin which are fantastic for eye health.

Beetroots need to be cooked delicately to retain these amazing nutrients. They can be lightly steamed and tossed in a salad with olive oil, lemon juice and goats cheese. Alternatively, this magnificent vegetable can be roasted, juiced, grated raw in to salads and blended in to soup.

My weekly ‘Nutritional Nugget’ written for Fields to Fork Organics

If you are interested in reading more ‘Nutritional Nuggets’, top tips and the latest nutrition news, sign up to my monthly newsletter at www.marcellerosenutrition.co.uk and like my Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/marcellerosenutrition/

 

Magnificent Mushrooms!

Mushrooms are rich in a surprising variety of vitamins and minerals, and as a result boast remarkable health benefits.
Mushrooms also contain unique phytochemicals which are crucial to supporting our immune system. These nutrients play an important role in regulating the activity of our immune cells.
Mushrooms also have anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties. The minerals zinc, selenium and manganese, present in mushrooms, are vital for our antioxidant enzyme function, and for preventing the damaging effects of oxidation in our body.
Studies suggest that these health properties can help protect us against the development of cancer, cardiovascular disease and autoimmune conditions. It is thought that including up to 6 whole mushrooms a day in your diet will offer this therapeutic benefit.
There are endless ways to incorporate mushrooms in to your every day meals. Add them to curries, soups and stir fries, enjoy them stuffed, sautéed, chopped into a frittata or raw in salads. 

My weekly ‘Nutritional Nugget’ written for Fields to Fork Organics


If you are interested in reading more ‘Nutritional Nuggets’, top tips and the latest nutrition news, sign up to my monthly newsletter at www.marcellerosenutrition.co.uk