blood pressure

What you didn't know about calcium!

What is it important for?

  • Bones and teeth
  • Required for muscle contraction
  • Blood pressure regulation
  • Nerve transmission
  • Involved in blood clotting
  • Aids the cell membrane control the movement of substances in and out of its cell
  • Maintenance of blood pH and electrolyte balance
  • Muscle contraction and function
  • Regulation of hormone release
  • Cell division regulation
  • Involved in heart beat regulation

Did you know…...? 

Calcium makes up between 1-2% of an adult’s body weight!

So how can we include it in our daily diet?

Many non-dairy foods are rich in calcium; so you can be dairy- free and still get plenty into your diet!

  • Dark green leafy vegetables including kale, collard leaves, parsley, watercress, broccoli ( spinach though rich in calcium, contains oxalates which reduces its absorption)
  • Beans; soy beans
  • Seeds and nuts;  almonds , Brazil nuts, walnuts, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds
  • Wholegrains; buckwheat
  • Sardines (with bones) tinned wild salmon ( with bones!), tofu
  • Dairy; goats milk, cow’s milk, cottage cheese, yoghurt, cheese

An easy calcium rich recipe idea...............

Crispy Kale Chips
  • Wash and chop kale removing the really thick stems, 
  • Dry the kale properly- gently pat dry a clean tea towel
  • Melt some coconut oil in a baking tray and coat the kale
  • Add a sprinkle of Himalayan rock salt or sea salt, pepper, crushed almonds, sesame seeds and nutritional yeast flakes
  • Put in oven on a very low heat ( approx 70 degrees) 
  • Keep checking the kale and take out the crispy bits so they don’t burn
  • Crispy kale chips can be made in a dehydrator instead of the oven.

My weekly ‘Nutrient Spotlight’ written for Fields to Fork Organics

If you're not feeling your best and need some guidence, support and focus on your health and nutrition then give me a call. I would love to help. 07961 166582

If you are interested in receiving recipe inspiration, top tips and the latest nutrition news, sign up to my newsletter at and like my Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/marcellerosenutrition/

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Nutrient Spotlight on Potassium

lentil curry.jpg

What is it important for?
•    Blood Pressure regulation
•    Muscle contraction and function
•    Cardiovascular health
•    Nerve and heart function
•    The maintenance of our cell walls
•    Regulation of fluid balance within the body
•    Supporting bone health
•    The production of some hormones (FSH, ADH and aldosterone)
•    Making proteins to be used in the body
•    Helps to prevent the formation of kidney stones

Did you know…...? 
Approximately 37% of the western population is at risk of potassium deficiency

So how can we include it in our daily diet?
•    All vegetables contain potassium in varying amounts.
•    Dark green leafy vegetables including Swiss chard, spinach, bok choy, broccoli  
•    Colourful fruit/ veg; beetroots, carrots, tomatoes, squash, cantaloupe melon, papaya
•    Beans and pulses; lima beans, pinto beans,  soy beans, kidney beans, lentils
•    Seeds and nuts;  sunflower, almonds ,pecans
•    Wholegrains; millet, brown rice

An easy potassium rich recipe idea...............

Quick lentil and veg curry

•    Melt some coconut oil in a pan and sauté a chopped onion finely chopped ginger and garlic
•    Throw in a few teaspoons of fennel seeds, turmeric powder, ground coriander, ground cumin and garam masala and stir. 
•    Sauté this for a few minutes before adding a tin of coconut milk and some vegetable stock and bring almost to the boil
•    Add some chopped squash and carrots and simmer for about 15 minutes
•    Then add a large chopped tomato and 2 cups of (rinsed) red lentils and continue to cook for around 10 minutes
•    Turn off the heat and add a few big handfuls of leafy green veg such as spinach or chard and stir through.
•    Serve with brown basmati rice and enjoy! 

My weekly ‘Nutrient Spotlight’ written for Fields to Fork Organics

If you feel you could and should be feeling better and need some guidence, support and focus on your health and nutrition then give me a call. I would love to help. 07961 166582

If you are interested in receiving recipe inspiration, top tips and the latest nutrition news, sign up to my newsletter at and like my Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/marcellerosenutrition/

You can also join my free Facebook Group-  Fuss-Free Healthy Eating  https://www.facebook.com/groups/FussFreeHealthyEating/

Wonderful Wild Garlic

Blooming_wild_garlic.jpg

Wild garlic is more delicately flavoured than its conventional counterpart, with triangular shaped stems and leaves which resemble those of lily-of-the-valley. It has all the outstanding health benefits of cultivated garlic and more!  It’s hard to believe that some farmers’ still consider this plant a pesky weed when top chefs are serving it up in Michelin stared restaurants!

Wild garlic is particularly beneficial for cardiovascular health. It’s has anti-diabetic properties by helping to regulate blood sugar, it can reduce total cholesterol levels whilst increasing the healthy HDL cholesterol and it can reduce total triglyceride levels in the blood (all markers for cardio vascular disease). Recent research also suggests that wild garlic has even better blood pressure lowering properties than conventional garlic.

Further research suggests that the leaves of wild garlic may additionally offer anti- cancer protection.

Wild garlic can be used in almost any meal to create a wonderful aroma and flavour. It is particularly delicious in risotto, stir fries and chopped into omelettes. To promote it’s health benefits further, chop the wild garlic and leave it to sit for a few minutes before adding this culinary delight to the finished dish and serve up.

My weekly ‘Nutritional Nugget’ written for Fields to Fork Organics

If you are interested in reading more ‘Nutritional Nuggets’, top tips and the latest nutrition news, sign up to my monthly newsletter atwww.marcellerosenutrition.co.uk

 

Fabulous Fennel

Fennel plants at the market   

Fennel contains a myriad of vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients and has countless health benefits. Furthermore, it has been used for centuries as a herbal remedy for congestion, digestive problems and to promote breast milk flow, menstruation and urine flow. 

Clinical studies have indicated that the phytonutrient anethole has anti-cancer properties and can reduce inflammation. The research found that anethole inhibits the promotion of a harmful molecule which can alter genes and cause inflammation. 

Fennel promotes bone health due to it’s combination of iron, phosphorus, calcium, magnesium and manganese. Fennel’s potassium, calcium and magnesium composition can help to lower blood pressure and the fibre content will help to reduce cholesterol levels. Heart disease is associated with elevated levels of the molecule homocysteine in the body, however, fennel’s folate content can help to prevent it’s build up.
 
Fennel consists of a crunchy white bulb, pale green stalks and feathery green leaves from which flowers grow and where the seeds are found.
 
All parts of the fennel can be used in your cooking. The stalks are a delicious addition to a soup base or stock .They can be sautéed with fennel leaves and onions. Additionally, the leaves can add a subtle liquorice aroma to many a dish. The seeds can spice up any meal, be brewed as herbal drink or just chewed to promote good digestion. The bulb can be chopped into salads, steamed, sautéed or roasted as a delicious starter or side.

My weekly ‘Nutritional Nugget’ written for Fields to Fork Organics

If you are interested in reading more ‘Nutritional Nuggets’, top tips and the latest nutrition news, sign up to my monthly newsletter at www.marcellerosenutrition.co.uk