glucosinolates

Brilliant Broccoli!

Broccoli contains an abundance of fabulous nutrients and is amazing for our health in so many ways. Perhaps broccoli is known best for its anti-cancer properties and so I will endeavour to explain why. 

Broccoli is exceptional as it has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, along with detoxification promoting abilities. It is this special combination of attributes that are believed to help prevent cancer. 

Broccoli is rich in vitamin C, kaempferol, quercetin, carotenoids, vitamin E and zinc. These anti- oxidants neutralise harmful free radicals and hence reduce oxidative stress in the body. 
The unique combination of glucosinolates found in broccoli, break down to form isothiocyanates (ITC’s). These ITC’s, help to suppress unwanted inflammatory responses in the body. Additionally, the polyphenol kaempferol reduces the effect of allergy associated substances, consequently reducing chronic inflammation in our body.

What’s more, ITC’s help to regulate the detoxification process in the cells of our body. This ensures we are eliminating harmful substances which can accumulate and then contribute to the development cancer.

Broccoli is fantastic in soups, omelettes and stir fries or just lightly steamed to retain its nutrients. Top tip: store your unused stems in the freezer to use in a quick blended vegetable soup.

My weekly ‘Nutritional Nugget’ written for Fields to Fork Organics

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Savour the Flavour of Kohlrabi!

This nutrient packed vegetable will add crunch to any dish! As part of the brassica family, kohlrabi has a sweeter more mellow flavour that its veggie relatives, cabbage and turnip.

Kohlrabi’s nutrient content includes vitamins minerals and phytonutrients. The calcium magnesium, phosphorus, manganese and potassium contribute towards kohlrabi’s bone supporting properties. 

Furthermore, the glucosoinolates (found in all brassica vegetables) are thought to have anti- cancer benefits. These nutrients will be especially potent when eating fresh, raw kohlrabi, due to increased enzyme activity. However, when adding to a cooked dish, chop the kohlrabi and allow it to sit for around 10 minutes first, to optimise these health benefits.
 
This is a versatile vegetable; to prepare, just peel off the outer tough layer of the bulb with a veggie peeler. kohlrabi is delicious grated into a cold ‘rabi-slaw ‘, sliced into a crudités or chopped into salads. It may also be blended into a vegetable soup, roasted with sweet potato, carrots, peppers and squash, stir-fried or steamed.

Alternatively, mix grated kohlrabi with beaten eggs and ground almonds and pop in a pan with some coconut oil to create tasty ‘rabi fritters’.

My weekly ‘Nutritional Nugget’ written for Fields to Fork Organics

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Perfect ....Purple Sprouting Broccoli

Purple sprouting broccoli has a more robust, sweet, earthy flavour than green broccoli varieties. Research indicates that the purple sprouting variety has even higher levels of the special compounds known as phytonutrients than green broccoli. These nutrients provide many of broccoli’s outstanding health benefits.

Broccoli is bursting with antioxidants, with high levels of vitamin C, vitamin E, manganese and zinc. Additionally it is packed with phytonutrients from the flavonoid and carotenoid groups. These antioxidants help to reduce oxidative stress in the body which results in lower inflammation and can help to reduce the risk of cancer.

Furthermore, purple sprouting broccoli contains high levels of glucosinolates, which are converted by the body to a substance vital for the excretion of toxins.

Purple sprouting broccoli has a delicate taste which works well in recipes with salty and tangy flavours. Be sure to include anchovies, capers, soy or lemon in your broccoli recipes. Add to omelettes, stir fries and soups or dip the florets (raw or steamed) in to a lemony tahini dressing for a healthy tasty treat.

My weekly ‘Nutritional Nugget’ written for Fields to Fork Organics

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Superb Swede!

Swede is bursting with nutrients and consequently boasts many health properties. Not to be confused with the turnip, swede has yellow or white flesh and is much larger than the turnip.


Swede, like other cruciferous vegetables, is rich in glucosinolates. Studies indicate that these phytonutrients have anti- cancer properties. Swedes are also packed with antioxidants including vitamin C, carotenoids, zinc and manganese. 


The fibre content in swedes helps promote a healthy digestive tract, whilst the magnesium, calcium, potassium and phosphorus content help to support bone health.


Swedes can be eaten raw, grated like a cabbage. Alternatively roast your swede with onions, carrots and sweet potato, add it to soups and stews or mash it into a healthy vegetable ensemble.

My weekly ‘Nutritional Nugget’ written for Fields to Fork Organics
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K is for Kale!

Kale is one of the richest sources of vitamin K, but it also boasts high vitamin C and vitamin A content, and is packed with a variety of other vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients.

Vitamin K is vital for bone health and blood clotting. We produce about half of our vitamin K requirement in our gut; however we need to obtain the rest from our diet. The calcium and magnesium content in kale will also contribute to protecting our bones from conditions such as osteoporosis.

Furthermore, kale is leading source of a selection of remarkable glucosinolates. When digested, these special phytonutrients are transformed to anti-cancer compounds by the body.

Before cooking kale, apply some lemon juice to the leaves and let them sit for a few minutes to maximise the health benefits.

Kale can be prepared in a variety of ways; try crunchy kale chips, a crisp kale salad, or a creamy kale risotto.  Alternatively sauté kale, ginger and garlic in to a mouth watering dish or top a broth styled soup with some strips of wilted kale.

My weekly ‘Nutritional Nugget’ written for Fields to Fork Organics

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Clever Cauliflower!

Not only is cauliflower packed with a vast variety of nutrients, it offers an array of health benefits too. Perhaps the most interesting, is cauliflower’s ability to support our detoxification process!  We subject our body to a huge number of toxins everyday due to our lifestyle, the environment around us and our dietary choices. Cauliflower contains a number of special nutrients that boost our detoxification activities. Consequently, this helps to optimise our liver’s ability to breakdown toxins which can then be released from the body.  Additionally cauliflower contains nutrients called glucosinolates which actually activate and regulate our detoxification enzymes; again supporting the liver in its important job.  To enhance cauliflower’s health promoting properties, cut into florets and then let sit for 5 minutes before cooking. Healthy sauté cauliflower with a little stock, to retain both the nutrients and flavour. Cauliflower can also be enjoyed in soups, curries and stir fries or grated into healthy cauliflower rice.    My weekly ‘Nutritional Nugget’ written for  Fields to Fork Organics       If you are interested in reading more of my ‘Nutritional Nuggets’, top tips and the latest nutrition news, sign up to my monthly newsletter at    www.marcellerosenutrition.co.uk

Not only is cauliflower packed with a vast variety of nutrients, it offers an array of health benefits too. Perhaps the most interesting, is cauliflower’s ability to support our detoxification process!

We subject our body to a huge number of toxins everyday due to our lifestyle, the environment around us and our dietary choices. Cauliflower contains a number of special nutrients that boost our detoxification activities. Consequently, this helps to optimise our liver’s ability to breakdown toxins which can then be released from the body.

Additionally cauliflower contains nutrients called glucosinolates which actually activate and regulate our detoxification enzymes; again supporting the liver in its important job.

To enhance cauliflower’s health promoting properties, cut into florets and then let sit for 5 minutes before cooking. Healthy sauté cauliflower with a little stock, to retain both the nutrients and flavour. Cauliflower can also be enjoyed in soups, curries and stir fries or grated into healthy cauliflower rice.

My weekly ‘Nutritional Nugget’ written for Fields to Fork Organics

If you are interested in reading more of my ‘Nutritional Nuggets’, top tips and the latest nutrition news, sign up to my monthly newsletter at www.marcellerosenutrition.co.uk