iron

Have you heard of this anti-cancer, antioxidant, liver detoxifying mineral?

 Molybdenum is a trace mineral essential for a variety of important functions within the body.

What is it important for?

Anti- cancer properties

Antioxidant support

Liver detoxification

Helps to prevent tooth decay

Important for fertility

Required for the activity of some enzymes in the body

Connective tissue development ( ligaments, cartilage etc)

Breaking down fats

Regulation of iron within the body

Helps to prevent yeast and fungal infections

Needed to convert sulphite to sulphate

Did you know…...?

The molybdenum content in food is vastly dependent on the soil in which it grows and the water it receives for growth.

So how can we include it in our daily diet?

Vegetables and fruit; Cauliflower, green peas, spinach, garlic, tomatoes, celery, cucumber

Beans and pulses; lentils, split peas, black eye peas, lima beans, kidney beans

Seeds and nuts;  sesame seeds, walnuts, almonds

Wholegrains; oats, buckwheat, brown rice, rye, barley

An easy molybdenum rich recipe idea...............

Fragrant Cauliflower Rice
Blitz a whole cauliflower (stalk and leaves removed) in a blender until it resembles slightly larger than couscous sized pieces or alternatively grate the cauliflower by hand
Melt some coconut oil in a pan and throw in a finely chopped onion, a couple of cloves of crushed garlic, 1 teaspoon of turmeric powder, 1 teaspoon of cumin powder, half a teaspoon of ginger powder and season with Himalayan salt and black pepper
Sauté this for a few minutes and keep stirring
Add the cauliflower along with 2 tablespoons or vegetable stock, water or bone broth, gently stir, cover with a lid and allow to steam for approximately 5 minutes
Combine with steamed peas or crushed almonds and serve.

My weekly ‘Nutrient Spotlight’ written for Fields to Fork Organics

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Ravishing Radish!

radishes.png

This peppery tasting vegetable packs a nutritional punch when it comes to the many nutrients it contains. It is a great source of minerals namely potassium, manganese, magnesium, calcium, iron, phosphorus and zinc. 

Notably, the radish is rich in vitamin C, which is a nutrient that needs to be replaced daily. Vitamin C is a water soluble vitamin and can be dramatically reduced in the body, with stress and environmental factors such as cigarette smoke. This important vitamin aids the rebuilding of body tissues and blood vessels and is vital for immune support. 

Radishes act as a natural diuretic and by increasing the production of urine, will actively promote kidney and urinary health. Radishes contain sulphur-based compounds, which help to regulate the production of bilirubin and increase the flow of bile from the liver to the gallbladder, and into the small intestine. The radish is consequently a natural detoxifier with superb digestive supporting properties.

Radishes make a brilliant crunchy crudité, and can be grated, pickled or sliced into a tasty cabbage and radish slaw. However radishes are particularly delicious blended into a zingy dip or combined with thinly sliced beef, watercress, spring onions and ginger to create a mouth watering Japanese style roll up. 

My weekly ‘Nutritional Nugget’ written for Fields to Fork Organics

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Classy Cavolo Nero

cavolo nero.jpg

Otherwise known as Tuscan kale, cavolo nero has its own rich, intense flavour. This relative of kale packs a punch in terms of nutrients containing vitamins A, C and K, the minerals calcium, manganese, and iron and a variety of antioxidants.

As with other cruciferous vegetables cavolo nero is rich in sulphur containing phytonutrients. These help the liver to process toxins so that they can be excreted. It is thought that this activity contributes to the vegetable’s anti-tumour properties and may help to prevent a number of cancers.

Early findings suggest that cavolo nero may have neuro-protective effects on people suffering from multiple sclerosis, but further research is needed to identify the mechanisms.

The antioxidants lutein, zeaxanthin and beta-carotene, present in cavolo nero, are especially beneficial for eye health. Research indicates that these nutrients may help to protect against age-related macular degeneration.

This versatile vegetable can be sautéed or steamed, tossed into stir-fries, salads or smoothies. It will especially impress sautéed with onion, rosemary, chilli and garlic to create a delicious, antioxidant boosting dish.

My weekly ‘Nutritional Nugget’ written for Fields to Fork Organics

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Beautiful Beetroot

Beetroot belongs to the chenopod family and along with other family members (including chard, spinach and quinoa) it does not fail in terms of its super nutritious benefits. Beetroot is a valuable source of folate, iron, copper, magnesium, manganese, potassium and vitamin C.

In addition, beetroot has unique pigments which function as both anti oxidants and anti-inflammatory nutrients. Researchers are beginning to look into whether these nutrients can reduce tumour growth in cancer and though in early stages, there have been encouraging results.

Preliminary studies also indicate that the unique mix of nutrients can help reduce the risk of atherosclerosis and type 2 diabetes. The B complex vitamin choline in beetroot has also been shown to reduce inflammation with regards to cardiovascular disease.

Additionally, the special pigments in beetroot are thought to help stimulate detoxification activity, consequently aiding the removal of toxins from the body.

Beetroot contains a special type of dietary fibre (as with carrots) that is particularly beneficial to our digestive tract and will offer further cardio vascular support.

Don’t forget to make use of the beetroot’s green leaves which are also highly nutritious. Beet greens are especially high in the nutrients lutein and zeaxanthin which are fantastic for eye health.

Beetroots need to be cooked delicately to retain these amazing nutrients. They can be lightly steamed and tossed in a salad with olive oil, lemon juice and goats cheese. Alternatively, this magnificent vegetable can be roasted, juiced, grated raw in to salads and blended in to soup.

My weekly ‘Nutritional Nugget’ written for Fields to Fork Organics

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Fabulous Fennel

Fennel plants at the market   

Fennel contains a myriad of vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients and has countless health benefits. Furthermore, it has been used for centuries as a herbal remedy for congestion, digestive problems and to promote breast milk flow, menstruation and urine flow. 

Clinical studies have indicated that the phytonutrient anethole has anti-cancer properties and can reduce inflammation. The research found that anethole inhibits the promotion of a harmful molecule which can alter genes and cause inflammation. 

Fennel promotes bone health due to it’s combination of iron, phosphorus, calcium, magnesium and manganese. Fennel’s potassium, calcium and magnesium composition can help to lower blood pressure and the fibre content will help to reduce cholesterol levels. Heart disease is associated with elevated levels of the molecule homocysteine in the body, however, fennel’s folate content can help to prevent it’s build up.
 
Fennel consists of a crunchy white bulb, pale green stalks and feathery green leaves from which flowers grow and where the seeds are found.
 
All parts of the fennel can be used in your cooking. The stalks are a delicious addition to a soup base or stock .They can be sautéed with fennel leaves and onions. Additionally, the leaves can add a subtle liquorice aroma to many a dish. The seeds can spice up any meal, be brewed as herbal drink or just chewed to promote good digestion. The bulb can be chopped into salads, steamed, sautéed or roasted as a delicious starter or side.

My weekly ‘Nutritional Nugget’ written for Fields to Fork Organics

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Awesome Artichokes

Jerusalem artichokes are the fleshy, bumpy, root vegetables not to be confused with the edible flowering globe artichoke. Known also as the sunchoke, sunroot and earthapple this tuber vegetable is rich in nutrients and has wonderful health promoting properties.


The Jerusalem artichoke is an excellent source of soluble and insoluble fibre providing protection against gut problems including colon cancer. In addition, this vegetable contains a unique type of carbohydrate in the form of inulin. This substance passes undigested in the gut, all the way down to our large intestine, where it becomes a great source of food for our probiotic bacteria. Allowing these beneficial bacteria to flourish in the gut is vital for both our immune system and digestive health.


The Jerusalem artichoke contains many minerals however it is particularly rich in iron, which is essential for the delivery of oxygen to every cell within your body. Furthermore, the high potassium content in Jerusalem artichokes can help to maintain normal blood pressure and will also help our muscles to work effectively.


The artichoke is particularly versatile; it can be eaten raw in salads, mashed, roasted, sautéed, steamed or stir fried. It is also delicious in soups and stews.

Top tip; Place the cut pieces of Jerusalem artichokes in a bowl of cold water and lemon juice to prevent them from browning when exposed to the air.

My weekly ‘Nutritional Nugget’ written for Fields to Fork Organics

If you are interested in reading more ‘Nutritional Nuggets’, top tips and the latest nutrition news, sign up to my monthly newsletter at www.marcellerosenutrition.co.uk