nutrients

Captivating Cabbage!

Cabbage has countless health promoting nutrients and many are shared with other Brassica family vegetables including kale and broccoli. However, cabbage also has its own distinctive nutrients and properties.

Savoy cabbages are particularly rich in the nutrient sinigrin. This has unique anti-cancer properties and is particularly associated with fighting bladder, colon and prostate cancers.

Additionally, cabbage can assist in lowering cholesterol. Specific components of the cabbage fibre, bind with bile acids in our gastrointestinal tract. This promotes bile excretion which as a result lowers cholesterol.

It has long been recognised that cabbage juice helps to heal stomach ulcers. Cabbage is rich in glutamine which helps to heal the lining of the stomach and digestive tract. However, there are other special phytonutrients in cabbage that help to regulate the amount of H. pylori bacteria in the stomach. When populations of this bacterium become too large, the H. pylori can latch on to the stomach lining, which can lead to the development of stomach ulcers.

In order to maximise the health benefits of cabbage, use the steaming or healthy sauté method (i.e. sauté with a little water, broth or stock). To promote the cabbage’s healthful enzyme activity, chop the cabbage and let it sit for 5 minutes before consuming or cooking. However, if you wish to benefit from cabbage’s high vitamin C content, wash and cut just before consumption!

To enjoy, shred in to an Asian salad with onion, coriander, chilli and cashews, add to soups, stews and stir fries or stuff the leaves – Russian style. Alternatively you can ferment your cabbage into some wonderful therapeutic sauerkraut.

My weekly ‘Nutritional Nugget’ written for Fields to Fork Organics

If you are interested in reading more ‘Nutritional Nuggets’, top tips and the latest nutrition news, sign up to my monthly newsletter at www.marcellerosenutrition.co.uk

 

Awesome Artichokes

Jerusalem artichokes are the fleshy, bumpy, root vegetables not to be confused with the edible flowering globe artichoke. Known also as the sunchoke, sunroot and earthapple this tuber vegetable is rich in nutrients and has wonderful health promoting properties.


The Jerusalem artichoke is an excellent source of soluble and insoluble fibre providing protection against gut problems including colon cancer. In addition, this vegetable contains a unique type of carbohydrate in the form of inulin. This substance passes undigested in the gut, all the way down to our large intestine, where it becomes a great source of food for our probiotic bacteria. Allowing these beneficial bacteria to flourish in the gut is vital for both our immune system and digestive health.


The Jerusalem artichoke contains many minerals however it is particularly rich in iron, which is essential for the delivery of oxygen to every cell within your body. Furthermore, the high potassium content in Jerusalem artichokes can help to maintain normal blood pressure and will also help our muscles to work effectively.


The artichoke is particularly versatile; it can be eaten raw in salads, mashed, roasted, sautéed, steamed or stir fried. It is also delicious in soups and stews.

Top tip; Place the cut pieces of Jerusalem artichokes in a bowl of cold water and lemon juice to prevent them from browning when exposed to the air.

My weekly ‘Nutritional Nugget’ written for Fields to Fork Organics

If you are interested in reading more ‘Nutritional Nuggets’, top tips and the latest nutrition news, sign up to my monthly newsletter at www.marcellerosenutrition.co.uk

 

Magnificent Mushrooms!

Mushrooms are rich in a surprising variety of vitamins and minerals, and as a result boast remarkable health benefits.
Mushrooms also contain unique phytochemicals which are crucial to supporting our immune system. These nutrients play an important role in regulating the activity of our immune cells.
Mushrooms also have anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties. The minerals zinc, selenium and manganese, present in mushrooms, are vital for our antioxidant enzyme function, and for preventing the damaging effects of oxidation in our body.
Studies suggest that these health properties can help protect us against the development of cancer, cardiovascular disease and autoimmune conditions. It is thought that including up to 6 whole mushrooms a day in your diet will offer this therapeutic benefit.
There are endless ways to incorporate mushrooms in to your every day meals. Add them to curries, soups and stir fries, enjoy them stuffed, sautéed, chopped into a frittata or raw in salads. 

My weekly ‘Nutritional Nugget’ written for Fields to Fork Organics


If you are interested in reading more ‘Nutritional Nuggets’, top tips and the latest nutrition news, sign up to my monthly newsletter at www.marcellerosenutrition.co.uk

Superb Swede!

Swede is bursting with nutrients and consequently boasts many health properties. Not to be confused with the turnip, swede has yellow or white flesh and is much larger than the turnip.


Swede, like other cruciferous vegetables, is rich in glucosinolates. Studies indicate that these phytonutrients have anti- cancer properties. Swedes are also packed with antioxidants including vitamin C, carotenoids, zinc and manganese. 


The fibre content in swedes helps promote a healthy digestive tract, whilst the magnesium, calcium, potassium and phosphorus content help to support bone health.


Swedes can be eaten raw, grated like a cabbage. Alternatively roast your swede with onions, carrots and sweet potato, add it to soups and stews or mash it into a healthy vegetable ensemble.

My weekly ‘Nutritional Nugget’ written for Fields to Fork Organics
If you are interested in reading more ‘Nutritional Nuggets’, top tips and the latest nutrition news, sign up to my monthly newsletter at www.marcellerosenutrition.co.uk

Brilliant Brussels

Though usually seen as a festive side dish, brussel sprouts are in fact a ‘super veg’, bursting with an amazing variety of beneficial nutrients. It is these nutrients that promote it's wonderful health benefits.

Brussel sprouts belong to the group of vegetables known as the brassica family, which includes broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage. These vegetables share many special properties; however it is thought that the brussel has certain antioxidant nutrients that are unlikely to be found in any other food.

Many studies have been conducted in to the brussel sprout’s anti cancer properties. Chronic inflammation, low antioxidant status and poor liver detoxification may all play a role in the development of cancer. However, it is thought that the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and detox promoting nutrients packed in to the brussel sprout, contribute to its anti cancer mechanisms.

Avoid overcooking brussels to retain their nutrient status and taste. Cut into four and let them sit for a few minutes before steaming, for optimal health benefits.

Try roasting your brussels with pecans and garlic, tossing them lightly steamed in to a salad, with onion, feta and walnuts or simply steam, dress with olive oil and season.

My weekly ‘Nutritional Nugget’ written for Fields to Fork Organics

If you are interested in reading more ‘Nutritional Nuggets’, top tips and the latest nutrition news, sign up to my monthly newsletter at www.marcellerosenutrition.co.uk

Clever Cauliflower!

Not only is cauliflower packed with a vast variety of nutrients, it offers an array of health benefits too. Perhaps the most interesting, is cauliflower’s ability to support our detoxification process!  We subject our body to a huge number of toxins everyday due to our lifestyle, the environment around us and our dietary choices. Cauliflower contains a number of special nutrients that boost our detoxification activities. Consequently, this helps to optimise our liver’s ability to breakdown toxins which can then be released from the body.  Additionally cauliflower contains nutrients called glucosinolates which actually activate and regulate our detoxification enzymes; again supporting the liver in its important job.  To enhance cauliflower’s health promoting properties, cut into florets and then let sit for 5 minutes before cooking. Healthy sauté cauliflower with a little stock, to retain both the nutrients and flavour. Cauliflower can also be enjoyed in soups, curries and stir fries or grated into healthy cauliflower rice.    My weekly ‘Nutritional Nugget’ written for  Fields to Fork Organics       If you are interested in reading more of my ‘Nutritional Nuggets’, top tips and the latest nutrition news, sign up to my monthly newsletter at    www.marcellerosenutrition.co.uk

Not only is cauliflower packed with a vast variety of nutrients, it offers an array of health benefits too. Perhaps the most interesting, is cauliflower’s ability to support our detoxification process!

We subject our body to a huge number of toxins everyday due to our lifestyle, the environment around us and our dietary choices. Cauliflower contains a number of special nutrients that boost our detoxification activities. Consequently, this helps to optimise our liver’s ability to breakdown toxins which can then be released from the body.

Additionally cauliflower contains nutrients called glucosinolates which actually activate and regulate our detoxification enzymes; again supporting the liver in its important job.

To enhance cauliflower’s health promoting properties, cut into florets and then let sit for 5 minutes before cooking. Healthy sauté cauliflower with a little stock, to retain both the nutrients and flavour. Cauliflower can also be enjoyed in soups, curries and stir fries or grated into healthy cauliflower rice.

My weekly ‘Nutritional Nugget’ written for Fields to Fork Organics

If you are interested in reading more of my ‘Nutritional Nuggets’, top tips and the latest nutrition news, sign up to my monthly newsletter at www.marcellerosenutrition.co.uk

Sensational Sweetcorn!

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Sweetcorn kernels are the fruit of the ‘Zea Mays’ plant. Packed with nutrients, including vitamins B1, B3, B5 ,B6 ,folic acid , and the minerals phosphorus and manganese, this wonderful plant is also rich in an array of phytonutrients and high in fibre.

The unique amalgamation of phytonutrients in sweetcorn provides general antioxidant protection. However it is the lutein and zeaxanthin, which are especially beneficial for eye health. Studies have indicated that these nutrients can help reduce the risk of AMD (Age-related macular degeneration) and cataracts.

Preliminary studies have also found that some of the phytonutrients in corn may have an action that helps to reduce the risk of high blood pressure.

The rich fibre content of sweetcorn, greatly benefits our digestive system. The fibre helps to promote the growth of friendly bacteria in the large intestine and can reduce the risk of intestinal health conditions.

The combination of the fibre and protein content of sweetcorn can also help with blood sugar control. By balancing the uptake of sugar into the gastrointestinal system, blood sugar levels can be stabilized.

To maintain the most nutrients and flavour, steam for 5 minutes, and drizzle with olive oil and a pinch of black pepper and Himalayan salt. For an extra kick, add lime juice and chilli powder to your steamed cob. Add sweetcorn to soups, stir fries and salads or combine with pulses to make tasty vegetarian patties.

My 'Nutritional Nugget' written for Field to Fork Organics