phosphorus

Ravishing Radish!

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This peppery tasting vegetable packs a nutritional punch when it comes to the many nutrients it contains. It is a great source of minerals namely potassium, manganese, magnesium, calcium, iron, phosphorus and zinc. 

Notably, the radish is rich in vitamin C, which is a nutrient that needs to be replaced daily. Vitamin C is a water soluble vitamin and can be dramatically reduced in the body, with stress and environmental factors such as cigarette smoke. This important vitamin aids the rebuilding of body tissues and blood vessels and is vital for immune support. 

Radishes act as a natural diuretic and by increasing the production of urine, will actively promote kidney and urinary health. Radishes contain sulphur-based compounds, which help to regulate the production of bilirubin and increase the flow of bile from the liver to the gallbladder, and into the small intestine. The radish is consequently a natural detoxifier with superb digestive supporting properties.

Radishes make a brilliant crunchy crudité, and can be grated, pickled or sliced into a tasty cabbage and radish slaw. However radishes are particularly delicious blended into a zingy dip or combined with thinly sliced beef, watercress, spring onions and ginger to create a mouth watering Japanese style roll up. 

My weekly ‘Nutritional Nugget’ written for Fields to Fork Organics

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Savour the Flavour of Kohlrabi!

This nutrient packed vegetable will add crunch to any dish! As part of the brassica family, kohlrabi has a sweeter more mellow flavour that its veggie relatives, cabbage and turnip.

Kohlrabi’s nutrient content includes vitamins minerals and phytonutrients. The calcium magnesium, phosphorus, manganese and potassium contribute towards kohlrabi’s bone supporting properties. 

Furthermore, the glucosoinolates (found in all brassica vegetables) are thought to have anti- cancer benefits. These nutrients will be especially potent when eating fresh, raw kohlrabi, due to increased enzyme activity. However, when adding to a cooked dish, chop the kohlrabi and allow it to sit for around 10 minutes first, to optimise these health benefits.
 
This is a versatile vegetable; to prepare, just peel off the outer tough layer of the bulb with a veggie peeler. kohlrabi is delicious grated into a cold ‘rabi-slaw ‘, sliced into a crudités or chopped into salads. It may also be blended into a vegetable soup, roasted with sweet potato, carrots, peppers and squash, stir-fried or steamed.

Alternatively, mix grated kohlrabi with beaten eggs and ground almonds and pop in a pan with some coconut oil to create tasty ‘rabi fritters’.

My weekly ‘Nutritional Nugget’ written for Fields to Fork Organics

If you are interested in reading more ‘Nutritional Nuggets’, top tips and the latest nutrition news, sign up to my monthly newsletter at www.marcellerosenutrition.co.uk and like my Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/marcellerosenutrition/

Fabulous Fennel

Fennel plants at the market   

Fennel contains a myriad of vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients and has countless health benefits. Furthermore, it has been used for centuries as a herbal remedy for congestion, digestive problems and to promote breast milk flow, menstruation and urine flow. 

Clinical studies have indicated that the phytonutrient anethole has anti-cancer properties and can reduce inflammation. The research found that anethole inhibits the promotion of a harmful molecule which can alter genes and cause inflammation. 

Fennel promotes bone health due to it’s combination of iron, phosphorus, calcium, magnesium and manganese. Fennel’s potassium, calcium and magnesium composition can help to lower blood pressure and the fibre content will help to reduce cholesterol levels. Heart disease is associated with elevated levels of the molecule homocysteine in the body, however, fennel’s folate content can help to prevent it’s build up.
 
Fennel consists of a crunchy white bulb, pale green stalks and feathery green leaves from which flowers grow and where the seeds are found.
 
All parts of the fennel can be used in your cooking. The stalks are a delicious addition to a soup base or stock .They can be sautéed with fennel leaves and onions. Additionally, the leaves can add a subtle liquorice aroma to many a dish. The seeds can spice up any meal, be brewed as herbal drink or just chewed to promote good digestion. The bulb can be chopped into salads, steamed, sautéed or roasted as a delicious starter or side.

My weekly ‘Nutritional Nugget’ written for Fields to Fork Organics

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Superb Swede!

Swede is bursting with nutrients and consequently boasts many health properties. Not to be confused with the turnip, swede has yellow or white flesh and is much larger than the turnip.


Swede, like other cruciferous vegetables, is rich in glucosinolates. Studies indicate that these phytonutrients have anti- cancer properties. Swedes are also packed with antioxidants including vitamin C, carotenoids, zinc and manganese. 


The fibre content in swedes helps promote a healthy digestive tract, whilst the magnesium, calcium, potassium and phosphorus content help to support bone health.


Swedes can be eaten raw, grated like a cabbage. Alternatively roast your swede with onions, carrots and sweet potato, add it to soups and stews or mash it into a healthy vegetable ensemble.

My weekly ‘Nutritional Nugget’ written for Fields to Fork Organics
If you are interested in reading more ‘Nutritional Nuggets’, top tips and the latest nutrition news, sign up to my monthly newsletter at www.marcellerosenutrition.co.uk